Events

2018 will be another busy year with a calendar full of pharmacy and aged care conferences across Australia, plus Webstercare will be hosting a range of Information Sessions.  

Come and check us out and find out more about Webstercares end-to-end medication management solutions for pharmacy and aged care.


Webstercare Managing Director Gerard Stevens (r) demonstrates to Aged Care Minister Ken Wyatt (l) and chief-of-staff Nick Hartland (centre) the many processes and systems that go into supporting safe and effective medication management and profile curation for residents of aged care facilities   Minister Wyatt with Gerard Stevens, accompanied by Webstercare’s Christine Veal (far left) and Peter Stevens (far right)

Photo Captions:

(Left) Webstercare Managing Director Gerard Stevens (r) demonstrates to Aged Care Minister Ken Wyatt (l) and chief-of-staff Nick Hartland (centre) the many processes and systems that go into supporting safe and effective medication management and profile curation for residents of aged care facilities.

(Right) Minister Wyatt with Gerard Stevens, accompanied by Webstercare’s Christine Veal (far left) and Peter Stevens (far right)

Aged Care Minister Ken Wyatt impressed with medication dedication

Last week I met Minister for Aged Care Ken Wyatt to discuss the challenges of providing medication management services in aged care facilities.
Minister Wyatt visited Webstercare Head Office in Leichhardt accompanied by three senior advisers NSW where we discussed the intricacies and difficulties being faced by pharmacies who support the often complex and extensive medication needs of residents living in aged care facilities.

This was followed by a tour of Webstercare’s pharmacy, Metropolitan Pharmacy Services, where Minister Wyatt was shown first-hand what goes into medication profile management and curation, and the necessary behind-the-scenes processes that ensure complete accuracy of medication dispensed by pharmacists using Webstercare systems.

I was impressed with the Minister’s level of knowledge and he asked many excellent questions. He is clearly determined to ensure greater certainty in the continuity of care and service for aged care residents.

Minister Wyatt visited Webstercare following a letter I sent requesting a meeting to discuss my concerns about challenges being faced by pharmacies who provide services to residential aged care facilities (RACFs).

I wanted to ensure that Minister Wyatt understood an anomaly in pharmacist payments for the professional services provided to frail aged care residents when compared to professional service payments provided for community clients.

When a pharmacy client crosses the threshold over into a residential aged care, home payments for professional pharmacy services stop. A community patient has full access to various Medschecks conducted by pharmacists. When the same customer crosses the threshold into residential care, the pharmacist continues to provide these services, but the payments stop with immediate effect. 

If an aged care resident deteriorates overnight, the pharmacy is expected to deliver urgent pain relief or antibiotics free-of-charge and, in the majority of cases, the pharmacist does. Urgent deliveries help to keep frail elderly residents from being admitted to emergency departments where they are transferred from a high-care, familiar environment to a low-care hospital environment.
There is a Medicare fee for the doctor to provide an emergency service to an aged care resident but no payment exists for pharmacies to provide emergency services to the same resident.

Minister Wyatt expressed his appreciation of Webstercare’s contribution to innovations in aged care which provide quality and safety in medication management.

He also encouraged Webstercare to prepare a submission to the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety to look at what reforms are needed in context of:
•    Logic of quality and safety;
•    Safe processes that are transparent; and
•    How medications can be handled safely in high-risk areas such as: identification of the resident from photo ID on the pack; crushing medicines; cytotoxic medicines; and bar code scanning of medicines for additional safety and accountability.

I am grateful for the time and interest Minister Wyatt gave me. We were delighted when Minister Wyatt accepted our invitation and even happier to discover he had allotted an hour from his busy schedule. That he spent a further half hour with us speaks volumes about his interest and level of engagement.

*     *     *     *     *


WORLD PHARMACIST DAY - 25th September 2018

Why trust is important on World Pharmacist Day

Trust is a powerful concept about confidence and reliability; about having enough confidence in someone or something to be able to rely on them to deliver a helpful outcome when you need it.

For pharmacists the concept of trust is crucial to both how consumers respond to what their pharmacy offers them and, more broadly, the long-term future of our noble profession.

For me there’s no secret as to why we pharmacists maintain a high level of community trust in the various surveys that rate jobs and professions each year. Health consumers have come to trust the level of knowledge that pharmacists possess and our commitment to using it for their benefit.

So medication knowledge and its perceived value is at the heart of what has become a social contract with the communities we care for.

And the Trust Surveys demonstrate that we’ve been successful: the community holds the broad view that they can expect consistent, knowledge-based delivery of services that benefit them.

The key to that tailored, individual advice is effective management of the individual’s medication profile. That’s at the core of what we do well as pharmacists.

In this day and age of blurred professional boundaries, medication profile management is unequivocally the pharmacist’s domain. It’s also where we can add value with the many tools and services we have at our disposal to deliver tailored pharmaceutical care.

It is the veracity of the medication profile and its effective management that leads to real and valued clinical benefits for individuals, and the ability of aged care facilities to meet their accreditation requirements. We must do better at explaining what we do so that it is viewed as a valued and trusted service rather than a bolt-on transaction.

It all comes down to ensuring individuals receive and take their medication as prescribed by their doctor. That’s the problem we’re solving here and a big part of the solution is understanding the patient’s personal motivations.

Medication management is at the heart of the social contract pharmacists have with the community. We must recognise that every patient is an individual with a unique medication profile which needs regular and accurate updating.


ITAC 

Date: 21st - 22nd November, 2018 

Venue: Adelaide Convention Centre  

Stand: P10 

http://www.itacconference.com.au/ehome/100174832/home/